Site Logo

 
It is currently Mon Sep 01, 2014 7:53 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 24 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: How should we approach the membership fees
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:45 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:35 pm
Posts: 861
We need to figure out what type of membership fees people are willing to pay. Of course this will be dependent on how large the maker shop is and what is in it.

Maker shops that I have seen range in memberships from around $40 dollar to $120.

Thoughts?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: How should we approach the membership fees
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 8:39 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 8:34 pm
Posts: 2
My brother is a mucky muck in the YMCA, I'll ask him what their model is all about. I can also ask some of the ACF guys how they roll.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: How should we approach the membership fees
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 8:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 8:46 pm
Posts: 1
I personally would be more interested in something in the lower range, with access to awesome tools over classes or formal events . . . my question is how the startup phase would work . . . where initially there isn't going to be much on offer in the way of space or tools, correct? I mean is there a necessary initial influx of cash to create the place people want to buy into? Would it be more like, once a large enough group implies interest and you could use the first month's membership fees to finance the buying of the first round of equipment? sorry if this is getting off-topic . . .


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: How should we approach the membership fees
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:05 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 8:50 pm
Posts: 324
Location: Stillwater
What about looking for outside sources for the money such as 3m and other local businesses.

_________________
My Blog
Twitter


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: How should we approach the membership fees
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:45 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:21 pm
Posts: 1
Location: South-Eastern Twin Cities
I think that 3M and other manufacturers are a great place to start for donations of both capitol and machinery. When I was in High School, we had a 3 CNC routers, a CNC lathe, and a CO2 laser donated to us by Smead Manufacturing.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: How should we approach the membership fees
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:28 pm
Posts: 6
Initial capital can be raised by offering discounted, pre-paid, refundable (if it doesn't fly) multi-year memberships. In the $100 range, I would bite. Throw in a little "early adopter love" discount and it's a cinch.


Last edited by Michael on Mon Jan 12, 2009 10:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: How should we approach the membership fees
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:28 pm
Posts: 6
eversorevertimortuus wrote:
I think that 3M and other manufacturers are a great place to start for donations of both capitol and machinery. When I was in High School, we had a 3 CNC routers, a CNC lathe, and a CO2 laser donated to us by Smead Manufacturing.


Without knowing the corporate structure of this venture, I'd say that this would be a hard sell. Even if it's a non-profit, that doesn't mean that donations would be tax deductible. Without a 501c designation (tax exempt), it might be difficult to get stuff donated like you would to a school.

Note - it's not impossible, just more difficult. Heck, people pay good money to put a name on a race car - so, who knows.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: How should we approach the membership fees
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:53 pm
Posts: 2
how bout family discounts for two geeks in love who wouldn't be able to afford $200... but would bring tons of expertise to the table? wink wink?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: How should we approach the membership fees
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 11:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 11:25 pm
Posts: 1
At an annual fee of $100 this is less than $10 a month. The problem is that it is harder to come up with $100 all at once versus $10 a month (or maybe $20). But if a means could be set up to collect a monthly fee a higher amount might be possible in a less painful way. Maybe credit card or PayPal automatic deductions? Also, some may be able to pay more, so perhaps set a minimum fee and hope for additional money that could go in a special account to be used formore expensive equipment and supplies.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: How should we approach the membership fees
PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 1:27 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2009 1:07 am
Posts: 1
There are already a few good models in the Twin Cities. Highpoint is a place for print makers. You pay your dues (in the $150/mo range) for 24/h access to presses, inks, etc. MN Book Arts has a similar deal for book stuff.

They're both pretty expensive, so I don't partake, even though I'd like to. But man, if there was a place that had engravers, laser cutters, milling machines, 3D printers, etc., I'd sure scrounge as many nickels as it would take to get a membership.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 24 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Template made by DEVPPL Flash Games